Past Artist
Baryshnikov Arts Center Resident Artist

Ligia Lewis

Choreographer Ligia Lewis (Berlin) will use melodrama as a point of departure for Water Will (in Melody), a devised choreographic work for three performers. Symbolically and playfully referential, the dance moves through myriad meanings and identifications, carrying with it a paradox of imagery and imagination. This is the final installment of Lewis’ triptych, beginning with Sorrow Swag and followed by minor matter, the work concludes with a critique of social mourning.

BAC Space Resident Artist


Ligia Lewis
Artist Bio

Ligia Lewis

Ligia Lewis is a choreographer and dancer. She creates affective choreographies while interrogating the metaphors and social inscriptions of the body. Her work is deeply personal and can be described as experientially rich and complex. Within her practice, Lewis continues to provoke the nuances of embodiment.

Her choreographies include: Sensation 1, $$$, Sorrow SwagMelancholy: A White Mellow Drama, and minor matter. Lewis was awarded the Prix Jardin d’ Europe for Sorrow Swag and nominated for a NY Dance and Performance Bessie Award for minor matter. Her work has been presented in multiple contexts including Hebbel am Ufer Theater, Berlin; Tate Modern, London; Donau Festival, Krems; Abrons Arts Center/American Realness, NYC; Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; Impulstanz, Vienna; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Centre National de la Danse, Paris; Les Subsistances, Lyon; Kunst-Werke Berlin; NGBK gallery, Berlin; Human Resources Los Angeles, FLAX/Fahrenheit, Los Angeles; Tanzhaus, Zurich; and Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. She has collaborated with artists such as: Nkisi & Chino Amobi of NON WORDLWIDE, Twin Shadow, and Wu Tsang. As a dancer, she has performed for Ariel Efraim Ashbel, Eszter Salamon, Mette Ingvartsen, and Kat Valastur, among others.

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Ligia Lewis

BAC Story by Mlondi Zondi

Ligia Lewis

Jun 18, 2018

What does it mean for dance to be a site where “thingliness” is worked through, where the oscillation of the (black) body between thing, nothingness, and something else is bravely worked out as a kind of practice?

Ligia Lewis has completed two pieces of her BLUE, RED, WHITE trilogy, with Sorrow Swag (2014) and minor matter (2016) as the first two pieces of that trilogy. The Spring 2018 BAC residency is one of the first assemblies of a team of collaborators and the beginning of a rehearsal process for the third piece of the trilogy, Water Will (in Melody).

This rehearsal process includes Lewis, Berlin-based performer Makgosi Kgabi, and composer-performer Colin Self. As the final part of a trilogy, one might expect the process to have a sense of finality, perfect summation, or closure, but the creation process in the studio is dynamic, vibrant with many ideas, and with no sense of bringing thinking and action to a close.

At the work-in-progress showing in the John Cage and Merce Cunningham Studio, Lewis introduces the German fable of “the willful child” and the role that storytelling plays in the creation of this piece. She describes how these culturally familiar fables inform her process, how she tries to find deviancy within the text themselves and test the borders of language. The performers are on the floor, breathing audibly. Their movement is slow and sustained. The floor is treated as support, but the movers also pay attention to its characteristics, its texture, color, temperature, and scent. This is a practice that, during rehearsal, Lewis describes as experimenting with the senses through “emptying out subjectivity” and not giving primacy to “the body” as it is traditionally understood in dance. This practice stages what it means to access the risks and possibilities of sitting with nothingness, and exploring touch in the (impossible) community of things. This dance raises awareness of how material dance bodies relate to things, the ground, and the land.

Lewis’ practice of staying in the hold of nothingness, where blackness has often been relegated, runs the risk of reifying exactly what it challenges. Lewis takes up this risk and doesn’t run away from it, since, as performance theorist Fred Moten has argued in A Poetics of the Undercommons: “You think you have to say ‘No, I am not a thing.’ It’s a horrible experience to find that one is an object among other objects, a thing among other things...but the maneuver that requires you to claim humanness is horrible as well precisely because it may well replicate and entrench the disaster.” In that respect, Water Will challenges us to ask: how can what is deemed nothing be with nothing in dance? How does touch operate in that space, and how do we resist reducing touch to romance and subjectivity?

Water Will’s movement vocabulary is watery; gesture flows like waves, both gentle and turbulent. The successive and sequential undulations have no discernible initiation points; they do not end and they do not begin. However, the intended porousness of the theater landscape and the wavy flow of the choreographic vocabulary are not reducible to mere representations of how water moves. In other words, Lewis is not making the move championed by French ballet master Jean-Georges Noverre in his 18th Century dance treatises of creating sublime movement that mimics/simulates water. She is also not attached to a metaphorical or symbolic engagement with water. The question of water is fleshed out beyond our cultural associations with water (cleansing/catharsis). She is interested in water’s materiality in performance as it pertains to the water in us, which flows and pours out when we bleed, or cry, or make love.

The sounds created electronically by Colin Self merge with the vocal sounds made by Kgabi and Lewis, building to create a cacophonous sonic environment. Kgabi circles the stage, takes purposeful big steps. Her storytelling and operatic singing style is superimposed with Lewis’ speech that plays with alliteration. Speech breaks/brakes and the operatic turns into chesty growls, whistling, and unintelligible whispers. Self’s recorded sound summons Romantic German music’s utopianism. For Self, this is a process of calling up that tradition while trying to move away from some of its characteristics. The music in Water Will accentuates and names (il)legible the melodramatic form. During the post-showing conversation, Lewis articulates that these choices of experimentation with a variety of sonic arrangements occasion the breakdown of language, and open up ways to “other” the theater space itself, exposing its representational logics that mobilize the senses to titillate, in ways that further problematic racial fantasies. At a time where the “given” nature of ideas such as “the self,” “being,” “personhood,” and “the body” are under constant questioning and revision, there is much to be gleaned from this provocative practice of inhabiting nothingness, the void, and non-representationalism.

Visit Ligia's Residency Page

Mlondi Zondi is a PhD candidate in Performance Studies at Northwestern University with research interests in contemporary Black movement experiments, Black visual art, dramaturgy, and curatorial practice. Mlondi also makes performances and also co-edits an independent journal called Propter Nos. Prior to pursuing PhD study, Mlondi received an MFA in Dance from the University of California, Irvine and a BA (Hons) in Cultural Studies and Performance Studies from the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal. Mlondi has presented and participated in performance work by other art-makers at the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, the Durban Art Gallery, the Jomba Contemporary Dance Experience (in South Africa), the Laguna Beach Museum, Gibney in New York, San Francisco MoMA, High Concept Labs in Chicago, and Joe Goode Annex in San Francisco. Recently, Mlondi served as production consultant for Victory Gardens Theater's production of Mies Julie in Chicago.

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