Baryshnikov Arts Center

Past Artist
Baryshnikov Arts Center Resident Artist

Robyn Mineko Williams

Choreographer Robyn Mineko Williams (Chicago) will collaborate with graphic artist Jay T. Williams and composer Robert F. Haynes to develop a work exploring reasons, methods, and varying ways of revealing oneself to the world.

Princess Grace Foundation-USA Works-in-Progress Resident Artist



Artist Bio
Robyn Mineko Williams

Robyn Mineko Williams

Robyn Mineko Williams is from Chicago, Illinois. She was a member of Hubbard Street Dance Chicago for twelve seasons where she performed with the works of numerous internationally renowned choreographers such as Ohad Naharin, Jiri Kylian, William Forsythe, and Johan Inger and originated roles in the creations of Jorma Elo, Sharon Eyal, Twyla Tharp and Lar Lubovitch among others.

Williams began choreographing in 2001 for HSDC's Inside/Out Workshop and in 2010, alongside Terence Marling, co-choreographed a full length narrative work geared towards children, Harold and the Purple Crayon: A Dance Adventure, for Hubbard Street 2. She has since been commissioned for numerous works at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago as well as for Grand Rapids Ballet, Visceral Dance Chicago and The Nexus Project. Her choreography has been presented at venues such as the Kennedy Center, American Dance Festival, and NYC’s Joyce Theatre.

Williams was one of Dance Magazine’s 25 to Watch in 2014. She was a winner of Northwest Dance Project's International Choreography Competition in 2012 and was selected as an E-choreographer in 2013 for Springboard Danse Montreal. Williams is a recipient of the 2013 Princess Grace Choreographic Fellowship and a Princess Grace Foundation-USA 2014 Works In Progress Residency Grant.

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BAC Story by Lisa Rinehart
Robyn Mineko Williams

Robyn Mineko Williams

Jun 1, 2015

It’s day seven of Robyn Mineko Williams’ ten-day residency at BAC and the long narrow blackout blinds of studio 6A roll upwards. Bright boxes of sunlight stream across the floor and Williams squints in the glare. After days of experimenting with projected imagery in theatrical darkness, she looks happy to see the sun. She asks dancers Adrienne Lipson and Isaac Spencer to repeat a section.  

Choreographed in tandem with a dramatic play of projections, now it is simply two bodies working together with the weighted fluidity of molten metal. A lunge to the side is lengthened. A subtle shoulder shrug is shortened. The movement is precise; sometimes intricate, other times expansive, but always muscular. 

Williams watches, then turns to her brother and collaborator, graphic designer Jay T Williams. He smiles and shrugs from a table littered with idle laptops and a projector rendered useless by the sunlight. He seems perfectly fine with his light design being temporarily nixed. 

“I don’t think there’s any reason we can’t do both things,” she says, and rehearsal continues with the blinds open.

This calm acceptance of multiple possibilities seems typical for the soft-spoken 37-year-old Mineko Williams. A former dancer with Hubbard Street Dance Chicago (HSDC), she is a self-professed introvert who didn’t plan on being a choreographer.

“As a dancer I wasn’t one to speak up a lot. It wasn’t my way,” she says, “I guess that’s why it surprised me to be in the front of the room and enjoying it.”

But there was never ambivalence about dancing. “Legend goes that I was bullying my mom for dance lessons when I was three,” she says, “but she made me wait until I was five.” She trained for 11 years with her mother’s teacher, Yvonne Brown Collodi at the Hinsdale Dance Academy in Illinois. After two years on scholarship at the Lou Conte Dance Studio she joined the River North Chicago Dance Company and eventually moved on to HSDC where she danced for 12 years before retiring in 2012.

In 2010 she collaborated with Terence Marling on Harold and the Purple Crayon: A Dance Adventure for Hubbard Street 2. Creating movement at first felt like a “science experiment,” she says, but after making the full length Recall for HSDC in 2012 she embraced the challenge. She has since choreographed several works for HSDC and Hubbard Street 2 and is often referred to as a rising talent in the Chicago dance scene. In 2013 she was awarded a Princess Grace Foundation-USA Choreographic Fellowship, and the following year a Princess Grace Foundation-USA Works-in-Progress Residency at BAC for the spring 2015 season.

“Movement is probably the most natural way for me to communicate,” she says. “Making dance is an extension of all that.” 

The BAC residency is Mineko Williams’ first opportunity to create something that is hers alone. She hopes it will be a full-length piece or collection of related pieces, but admits everything hinges on working with people with whom she feels an unspoken connection.

“I like the rehearsal space to be a fun place,” she says, “I think that’s when magic can happen.”

So she has chosen her residency collaborators carefully. Dancer Isaac Spencer is a dear friend and a fellow former member of Hubbard Street. He now lives in Germany so Mineko Williams was thrilled that he was available. Adrienne Lipson was part of a Hubbard Street 2 workshop and Mineko Williams took an immediate shine to her ready-for-anything attitude. As for composer Robert Haynes, he and Mineko Williams have created several pieces together and both feel a real synergy with one another.      

But Mineko Williams’ primary collaborator for her BAC residency is her brother Jay T whom she describes in an email as her “go to guy for inspiration” and “the one person who gets me…my aesthetic and my vision probably the most naturally and clearly.”

“He said he’d never seen me do anything that represented me,” she says, “it turned a light on in me to do more, to explore more.”

Mineko Williams says her brother’s job with the marketing firm Fision doesn’t allow him time to experiment and make what he describes as “real art.”  That meant a learning curve for both of them. “He was quick to scrap ideas,” she says,  “whereas in our process, finding, sculpting and discovering what works as we keep delving into the process is more the norm.”

By day ten the blinds are back down. Invited guests stand and watch a time-lapse video of the rehearsal process as it flickers by on the front of Jay T’s shirt. Haynes’ brooding pulsating score fills the room and the dancers insinuate themselves amongst the onlookers.  They move in a fluid duet echoed by ghostly projections.  A grainy home movie of Lipson as a baby fills the back wall. Spencer and the grown Lipson mimic with a floppy, real time duet. Then it is just Lipson. She is still, captured like a reluctant specimen under a beam of refracted light. Her movements are small and subtle, but bursts with carefully restrained vigor. The showing ends as casually as it began, but Mineko Williams and her brother look relaxed and happy.  The segments are ideas – sparks of ideas – that Mineko Williams will take back to Chicago and blow into the full flame of her first independent effort. 

Visit Robyn's residency page

Lisa Rinehart is a former dancer with American Ballet Theatre. She is a freelance writer and video journalist covering the arts, culture and social issues for a wide range of online and print publications.

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All Photos: Todd Rosenberg