Baryshnikov Arts Center

Past Artist
Baryshnikov Arts Center Resident Artist

Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh

Choreographer Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh will develop Tombouctou – déjà vu, a companion piece to her recent work Insight, which was inspired by still life painting and focused on bodies, voices, and music and their relationships to space. Tombouctou – déjà vu will take a different approach, exploring the use of a narrative as means to provide a dramaturgical thread. This residency takes place in association with LMCC's Extended-Life Dance Development Initiative.

Vo-Dinh’s residency is part of DANSE: A French-American Festival of Performance and Ideas (May 1-18, 2014), organized by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States. Additional residency support is provided by Institut français, Paris.
 


Artist Bio
Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh

Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh

Ballet trained at the Conservatory in Tours, Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh, joined the Merce Cunningham Studio in New York in 1987. Upon her return to France she danced for François Raffinot from 1991 until 1996. Since 1997 she has been creating her own work and in 2012, Emmanuelle became the director of Le Phare Centre Choréographique National du Havre Haute-Normandie.


BAC Story by Silas Riener
Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh

Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh

Jun 6, 2014

In April I had the pleasure of attending rehearsals during the residency of Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh at BAC.  I watched run-throughs and improvisatory constructions she was working on, and had the opportunity to speak with Emmanuelle both in rehearsal and in emails about this work, titled “Tombouctou deja-vu,” set to premiere in 2015.

Emmanuelle started working on this piece from what she called “the idea of going to an unknown place.” 

It is such a privilege to see people working in the studio, before lights and costumes render work further into theatrical space, which can make it less accessible on a more intimate human scale.  There is a tender easiness to the relationships the performers have with each other, blurring the line between what is on-stage  interaction in performance, and what is just us being us together.  At many points in Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh’s work-in-progress it was hard for me to tell when they were relating to each other because they know each other, and when it was part of the organized theatrical landscape.  This ambiguity was totally charming; drawing me in towards Vo-Dinh’s interest in the “miniscule lives of the characters.”  For me this was the gentle and compelling center of the work, these slack indulgences of casual behavior. 

There are lots of different kinds of talking in the dance, people repeating names, or whispering to each other, or reading things off of cards (drawn from Brian Eno’s Oblique Strategies) which serve as kindling for the constructions and repetitions in the dance.  It bothered me not at all to feel foreign in these moments (I do not speak French) because I think I feel that way all the time when a performance is operating with some sort of beguiling or unknown methodology.  Also, it fit so naturally into more palpable structures within the dance itself.  Language molded casually or surreptitiously as improvisatory material, degraded, or gradually changed just as much as movement.  Emmanuelle said of this she was looking for a kind of cross between the body and the voice.  Watching the language fall apart becomes part of the patchwork landscape of gesture, movement through space, or fleeting scenes that occupy the 45 minutes of material.

The slanting personalities of the performers are so alluring.  In her work Emmanuelle plays with recursive time, looping back spatial constructions, catching a moment and freezing it through repetition, giving a heightened experience to the viewer of how time is passing, and how or why things are important.  She calls these moments ‘pistons’ in her work; they give a kind of direct visual satisfaction.

Hesitation seems exalted, like it’s been reclaimed from its in-between-state and is enacted as an entirely honest and separate way of embodying movement, which, to me, was gorgeous.

It was fascinating to see what specifically she worked on, how she honed certain moments or transitions into greater acuity.  In a particular section where a microphone is passed from a man speaking to a women (through two surrogates) which devolves into sort of orgiastic floor-bound swaying, Emmanuelle focused not only on the exactitude of the passing, or the intonation but on the rhythms of things, the amount of time that is transition, the amount that is build up.  Here the specificity and rigor supporting her work might reference her time studying with Merce Cunningham in the 80s in New York.  When the amplified responses speed up, the passing speeds up, and the language loses meaning, until the swinging microphone and repeated responses become a swirl of strange sexualized behavior, which ends as abruptly as it began gradually.  The kind of time things take seems so important.   

Further viewings recommended by Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh:
Luis Bunuel’s The Discrete Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)
Michael Haneke’s The Seventh Continent (1989)
Alex van Warmerdam’s The Northerners (1992)
Lars von Trier’s Dogville (2003)
Leos Carax’s Holy Motors (2012)

Visit Emmanuelle's Residency Page

Silas Riener graduated from Princeton University with a degree in Comparative Literature and Creative Writing, and completed his MFA in Dance at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. He was a member of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company from November 2007-11. As a performer, he has worked with Chantal Yzermans, Takehiro Ueyama, Christopher Williams, Jonah Bokaer, and in Rebecca Lazier's TERRAIN. Riener regularly collaborates with choreographer Rashaun Mitchell. His work has been curated at Architecture OMI, CATCH, as part of LMCC's River to River Festival, at Danspace Project, and at the BFI Gallery in Miami. In 2013 he was invited to participate as an inaugural member of LMCC's Extended Life Dance Development Program. He is a 2014 New York City Center Choreographic Fellow.

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Slideshow photos by: Laurent Philippe