Baryshnikov Arts Center

Past Artist
Baryshnikov Arts Center Resident Artist

Caroline Gravel

Choreographer/dancer Caroline Gravel will conduct research for Bains Publics: Of Suspense, a work based on the notion of surprise and curiosity, investigating external forces that act upon and resonate within the dancers’ body.



Artist Bio
Caroline Gravel

Caroline Gravel

Caroline Gravel is a dance artist based in Montreal, Canada. Since 2002, she has made creative contributions, worked and toured internationally as a solo artist and with several Montreal choreographers including Catherine Gaudet, Frédérick Gravel, Daniel Léveillé and Jean-Sébastien Lourdais. Mentored by choreographer Meg Stuart while her M.A., she conducted a study probing the intricacies of body states and the discourse of authorship within contemporary choreography. 

Active in her community, Gravel is an invited speaker and teacher in various contexts. She was recently elected at the board of the Quebec coalition of dance professionals, namely Regroupement québécois de la danse. In her latest works Bains Publics (2013) and Ma mère est un male alpha (2012), which The New York Times described as “intriguing” with “strange, unsettling spontaneity”, she explores the effect of the plasticity of the body on our perceptual and emotional senses.

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BAC Story by Lydia Bell
Caroline Gravel

Caroline Gravel

Apr 9, 2015

Caroline Gravel talks with her hands, her body, her hair. I don’t speak French but when she speaks to me in French I have the illusion of understanding—so convincing is her sense of gesture. When I first saw Gravel’s work (in an evening at Danspace Project curated by Jenn Joy and Noémie Solomon in 2013) I was struck by that sense of conviction in her solo Ma mère est un mâle alpha. The title immediately grabbed its audience with an assertion that needs no translation and Gravel didn’t let that attention go for one moment. 

In Gravel’s newest work, Bains Publics, she wants to engage differently with her audience. Her starting point—the concept of a public bath—provides a model for a shared experience without a clearly defined spectator. I was surprised to realize that the aggressive hold Gravel exerted over her audience in Ma mère est un mâle alpha is the very sense of control that she is currently questioning.

We discussed this shift in a recent studio visit and Gravel pointed out that part of this new point of inquiry is around the notion of constraint. Gravel’s movement vocabulary often employs a physical manifestation of constraint: there is a sense of pressure exerted from within her body that must contend with the space outside. In her research for Bains Publics, Gravel told me that she is interested in contending with the constraints of a theater: “How can the public feel free?” she wondered aloud to me.

For a recent studio showing in Studio 4B, Gravel positioned the audience in single chairs scattered throughout the studio with different facings. I was aware of my focus shifting between Gravel and her fellow performer, Laurence Dufour. My other choice as an audience member was to gaze at the mirrored wall where I could see both of the performers, my fellow audience, and myself. I had other choices available to me, of course, that I didn’t take: I could have scooted my chair around, for instance, or walked to a new chair, or left the studio altogether. I began to wonder if what Gravel is most interested in is the choices that we don’t make—the invisible constraints constantly acting on all of us.

One of the first things Gravel told me when I visited her studio was that she looks for authenticity in a dancer’s body. Or, as she explained to me, she doesn’t want to see a dancer moving excitedly, she wants to see excitement. Perhaps in Bains Publics, Gravel is demanding the same standards of her audience. She doesn’t want her audience to perform being present, she wants her audience to be present.

The question is how do you exact that presence from an audience? In a public bath, the heat of the sauna causes the core body temperature to rise, dilating the blood vessels and increasing blood flow to the skin’s surface. I’m not sure what the equivalent experience looks like for an audience but I have no doubt that Gravel will find out. 

Visit Caroline's residency page

Lydia Bell is a cultural producer and arts administrator. She is currently Director of Programming at Artis in New York where she oversees artist commissions, public programs, exhibitions, and the Artis Grant Program. Prior to joining Artis in 2014, Lydia was Development and Curatorial Associate at Danspace Project. Lydia has also worked on projects with Eiko & Koma, Sam Miller/OAM Company, and Movement Research and spoken on national and international panels on the subject of interdisciplinary performance. She is a graduate of the Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance at Wesleyan University.

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Upcoming page photo: Julie Artacho